Go-to-Market Strategy 101: Your Complete Guide

Growth is the dream of every business owner. The prospect of growth is never more exciting or uncertain than when your company is executing a go-to-market strategy.

So many moving parts demand a comprehensive strategy flexible enough to respond to challenges but strong enough to keep its shape in the face of innumerable pressures.

Our guide today will give you the 101 on go-to-market strategies and some actionable tips to create your own GTM plan.

What is a Go-to-Market (GTM) Strategy?

At its core, a go-to-market strategy is the methods and practices your company employs to introduce a new revenue stream. This could mean a product launch, a new feature, or an expansion into a new market.

Go-to-Market Strategy vs. Marketing Strategy

Your GTM strategy is not the same as your marketing strategy.

You can think of a GTM plan as the transition phase between creating a new revenue source and the act of turning that source on. Perhaps more accurately, it’s the plan to turn that source of revenue on.

This is in contrast to a marketing plan that is more narrowly focused on promoting the product and generating demand for it.

What’s in a GTM Strategy?

Any good GTM strategy should have these three aspects.

1. Flexibility

Your GTM process needs to remain efficient and flexible in the face of any challenge. Your leaders should be competent and in synch with the grand strategy to execute the vision without the need for inefficient chains of command. Lower-level workers need to understand the vision just as well, so they can adapt to challenges and call for necessary support before problems become unmanageable.

2. Repeatability and Scalability

Go-to-market is a process that directly feeds the growth of your business. In essence, it is growth because it involves expanding revenue channels and generating demand for brand-new products or features.

This is a process your company has to optimize over time because there are far too many moving parts and unique variables for any one strategy to ever be considered perfect.

A GTM strategy, therefore, needs to be repeatable and iterative. Each new version of go-to-market should build on the ones that came before it, incorporating new perspectives and data on performance.

Since GTM is fundamentally a growth strategy, it needs to be scalable. If your GTM isn’t scaling, then you aren’t growing.

3. A Unifying Perspective

Your first GTM strategy meeting is the time to lay out goals and expectations. More than this, it’s a time to get everyone on board with the vision your leaders have crafted.

All stakeholders need to understand their roles and how they stand to gain from the success of the plan and the company. This kind of unifying vision is what brings people together and forms a cohesive team. It builds motivation and understanding, and leads to a productive strategy.

Examples of Go-to-Market Strategy for Startups and Large Businesses

Go-to-market channels, or strategies, are best understood as sets of goals and how you plan to achieve them. For simplicity, we’ve organized this list into three types of GTM, defined by their primary mode of demand generation.

However, you could also look at these from the perspective of execution and build a plan with those ideas as the foundation.

Inbound Led

An inbound-led campaign is the bread and butter of many B2B GTM operations.

It involves generating and capturing demand via content marketing. Content should be marketed through multiple channels to ensure maximum lead capture. Data should be enriched on the back end before being qualified and fed to sales, which focuses on high-quality leads and conversions.

In an inbound-led campaign, your growth is tied to the ability of marketing and sales to work together to drive conversions. The more efficiently they can carry out this task, the more you’ll grow.

Product Led

Sometimes a product can speak for itself.

A product-led GTM strategy is right for SaaS companies that can roll out features and expansions at a minimal initial cost. The strength of the product means that users will uncover new features and adopt new products organically. Upselling, deals, checkout, and scaling can all be managed from within the product.

In a product-led GTM, growth is tied to the ability of the product to deliver value and promise even more through added features.

Category Led

An idea can transform a marketplace.

If your company has a revolutionary idea or technology, you can focus on becoming a category leader. This will be based on your ability to assume an authoritative position in your marketplace, either through thought leadership or culmination around a revolutionary product.

For category-led GTM, your growth is tied to your ability to build a movement and spearhead a new marketplace for your developing product or idea.

How Do You Create a Go-to-Market Plan?

Any go-to-market example will involve many moving parts and must be uniquely designed for your company and revenue stream.

Here are three principles you should follow when forming a new GTM plan.

1. Put Together a Strong Team

A go-to-market team needs representatives from marketing, sales, product, technology, customer service, and senior leadership. This is a complex team with many moving parts, so pick leadership candidates based on their ability to understand and articulate a strong vision while allowing for employee flexibility and enabling problem-solving.

2. Identify Your Motion

You’ll need to determine what motion your company will be executing. A motion is defined by the steps your company takes to add and nurture the new revenue stream that’s going to market.

The actions needed for each of these motions are unique, so each one will need a different team with distinct responsibilities.

The three motions identified by GTM partners are:

  • A new buyer persona: A new idealized buyer that your company needs to cater to. You’ll likely need new marketing materials, sales strategies, onboarding, and content.
  • A new product or service: You may now have new competitors, a new marketplace, and new requirements on educational content and industry knowledge.
  • A new geographic location: You may need new sales, marketing, onboarding, and resource strategies to equal or surpass growth in other locations.

3. Follow the M.O.V.E Framework

GTM partners developed the M.O.V.E. framework as a strategic process designed to simplify planning and streamline thought processes. If you’re unsure how to begin planning, these steps are a great place to start.

M.O.V.E. stands for:

  • Market: Who to market to?
  • Operations: What do we need to perform efficiently?
  • Velocity: When and how can we scale?
  • Expansion: Where will we grow the most?

M.O.V.E. stands for four questions that your leadership and key team members will all need to agree on answers to before implementing your plan.

Go-to-Market Must Be Constantly Reiterated

It’s crucial to understand that go-to-market is not a singular strategy or action. It can’t be encompassed by a single department or goal other than “for the success of the company.”

The point of acknowledging this is to understand that every GTM plan or strategy needs to be created with the goal of efficiency, flexibility, and a unified vision.

Read more about go-to-market strategies and how to optimize your newest revenue stream as quickly and efficiently as possible in “The Comprehensive Guide to Go-to-Market” ebook.

How to Build a Go-to-Market Team

The stakes are never higher than when forming a new go-to-market (GTM) team in advance of a product launch. Often, it’s a process where failure isn’t an option. Go-to-market strategies work best when they’re based on a strong vision and informed by competent advisors.

Ultimately, your success with your go-to-market will be based on your ability to select the best people for the job.

Today’s blog is an introduction to the go-to-market team structure. We’ll explain the typical job roles and how they can be flexibly implemented into any go-to-market strategy. Then, we’ll give you some tips for forming and cultivating a productive go-to-market team.

What is a Go-to-Market Team?

A go-to-market team is a group of leaders, workers, and individual contributors from several arms of your organization who come together to create and implement a go-to-market strategy.

They’re key representatives of revenue, marketing, sales, and other leadership roles who have demonstrated an ability to understand big ideas, contextualize them to their role, and act efficiently in the interests of the grand strategy. This strategy will in part be decided by them based on their input, meaning ownership and accountability should also be part of that plan.

Ultimately, it’s this flexibility that will separate a good go-to-market team from a great one.

A Typical Go-to-Market Team Structure

To keep this guide relevant to businesses of all sizes, we’ve chosen the five most important go-to-market team roles that each team should have.

Go-to-Market Manager

Your GTM manager needs to be a leader who understands how to articulate and enforce a strong vision while supporting the flexibility needed to run an efficient system. Their focus should be on team cohesion, efficiency, and long-term goals.

Your go-to-market lead job description should make it clear that final accountability will lie with the GTM manager. This understanding should lead to a greater emphasis on thorough planning and preparation, as well as constant reassurance that each member of the team understands their responsibilities.

A crucial responsibility of the go-to-market manager is to remain impartial. There may be inefficiencies caused by too many cooks in the kitchen, and GTM managers need to be ready and willing to streamline tasks and reduce or expand personnel as needed.

Marketing Manager

You’ll want a strong strategic vision for your go-to-market team. The marketing manager should be in charge of developing that strategy in tandem with the GTM manager.

While the GTM manager is focused on the overall team cohesion, the marketing manager will handle the oversight of strategy implementation among the marketing team. This will include tasks like performing market research, creating content strategies, and demand generation.

Marketing Team

The marketing team, led by the marketing manager, will be tasked with producing strategic content, marketing the content, and producing leads for sales to work with. Marketing teams should be in calibration with sales teams at all times to ensure consistent messaging, expectation setting, and mutual goals.

Sales Manager

While marketing is focused on how to tell people about the product, the sales manager will work with the GTM, revenue, and product departments to figure out how to best sell it. This includes developing a sales strategy, projecting sales goals, and managing sales personnel to keep them on track and in line with expectations.

Sales Team

The sales team’s job is to bring in revenue while setting customer expectations. Overpromising and under-delivering is a risk whenever a new GTM strategy is implemented, and it’s the sales team’s job to fairly and positively represent the product and the realistic ways in which it will improve the lives of customers.

Additional Roles

If you’re running a larger operation, these roles may be necessary to keep tasks streamlined and efficient:

  • Product Manager: Your product department should be represented, especially in conferences with sales and marketing teams.
  • Truth Source: Your truth source should be someone who can impartially gather information from different departments to form an accurate picture of performance.
  • Customer Experience Manager: Ideally someone from the marketing department who can ensure a smooth and consistent customer experience that fits with the wider GTM strategy.

5 Tips for a Productive Go-to-Market Team

Selecting the right people for the job is the most important piece of the puzzle. Once you’ve got your team together, it’s time to form a cohesive unit that is aligned, motivated, and productive.

How can you carry out this task? Here are five tips for supporting a productive go-to-market team.

1. Support Flexibility Through Cohesion

A strong GTM plan bends and doesn’t break. This is because there are overarching goals that each stakeholder understands. Moreover, they understand their role within that wider vision and never lose sight of it.

A strong plan is therefore flexible because it doesn’t rely on micromanaging or inefficient chains of command. Instead, it instills an understanding of primary goals, then tasks each individual with figuring out how to best achieve them.

2. Focus on Buyer Personas

It’s no secret that we love idealized buyers. They’re your best customers by far, the most loyal, they make the biggest purchases, and they’re always the first in line to buy a new product. Remember that the specificity of this fictional buyer is bound to elicit emotional responses from real buyers who see themselves in the challenges you’ve uncovered thanks to the persona.

3. Establish Goals and Metrics

Take time during the planning stage to get everyone on board with what success looks like. There should be no questions about what everyone is expected to deliver, how performance will be measured, and who will take responsibility for each aspect of the plan.

4. Gather Data and Refine

Even during the execution of a go-to-market strategy, you should be capable of gathering data and reacting based on key metrics that your team identified in advance.

5. Always Seek the Truth

When it comes to a strategy that involves many moving parts and department representatives, there are bound to be accountability shortfalls and communication mishaps.

There will be blame shifted for failures and numbers massaged to tell softer stories. During these times, it’s important to remember the bigger picture and reprioritize. It may help to assign a specific person to track metrics and figure out the facts surrounding the performance of the plan.

Not Just a Strategy, But a Process

Your go-to-market strategy won’t be perfect when you first create it. No matter how well you think you can plan, there will always be some variable you didn’t account for.

This reality is the driver behind our philosophy that your go-to-market process should be flexible and proactive. It should be capable of reacting to challenges and squashing them before they become unmanageable. Ideally, this should be possible without the need for micromanaging, allowing senior leaders to focus on long-term vision and steering the ship.

To learn more about go-to-market strategy and theory, check out our free 39-page Go-to-Market guide.

15 B2B Growth Metrics Marketers Should Track

A growing business is proof that your practices are working. It keeps you healthy and competitive, encourages investors, and gives you time to identify problems and build solutions to create even more value and growth.

Yet it’s not always easy to tell how quickly your company is growing, or even why. How can you separate your company from the ebbs and flows of the market, customer demand, and the performance of your competitors to generate an accurate picture of your growth?

Welcome to the world of B2B growth metrics.

We’ve compiled this list of some of the most important B2B growth metrics you can track and ways to calculate them.

Measuring B2B Marketing Effectiveness

B2B success is not different from success at other companies. It requires growth, which means you’ll always be looking out for new customers who spend more than your old ones.

You’ll need to know how much it costs to acquire new prospects and how long it will take them to become buyers. You’ll also need to know whether it’s time to focus more on market share or if you can safely enjoy a wave of category growth.

The best way to measure growth is with some key metrics that we’ll recommend today. First, you should understand the importance of category growth and why it should affect the way you read your growth metrics.

Category Growth Metrics vs. B2B Growth Metrics

Category growth is the phenomenon of increasing demand in the category of products you sell. For example, a company that makes bowling balls might take a particular interest in increasing the popularity of the game of bowling to unlock new customers and new revenue streams.

This is in contrast to a company that only advertises to current bowlers and doesn’t try to convert new ones. The first company is engaging in category growth tactics, while the second isn’t.

Why Category Growth Matters

In general, pursuing a category growth strategy is a luxury. But knowing how to track category growth is fundamental.

If your company is growing quickly, but more slowly than others in your industry, you may have a problem competing with these companies when your market is mature (i.e., it stops growing so much).

Tracking your category growth can tell you whether you should be focusing on competition or growth.

5 Metrics to Track Category Growth

Here are five metrics to check on B2B growth vs. category growth.

1. Share of Voice

Share of voice is a very popular public relations metric. It essentially tracks how frequently your brand is mentioned in relation to other brands. If your share of voice is falling despite rising revenues, this may mean you’re experiencing a boom in category growth but falling behind in the competition.

2. Web Traffic vs. Competition

Another way to measure yourself against your competitors is to check on web traffic. How often are customers finding and choosing your content over others? Branded web searches is a similar metric that can be used to find the same information.

3. Backlinks

Backlinks are other websites linking to yours. A high number of backlinks can indicate domain authority and mean that your brand is outperforming others when it comes to brand awareness and reputation.

4. Social Media Followers and Engagement vs. Competition

Once again, if you’re experiencing lots of growth in this area, it’s important to see how well your competitors are faring. The speed of your growth vs. theirs is ultimately what will matter most.

5. Category Sales and Revenue

The most direct way to track category growth is by combining the sales and revenue of all companies in your sector. How quickly is your revenue growing in comparison? This insight can be a valuable indicator of how your company is performing relative to competition.

5 Best Forward-Looking Sales Metrics

These five sales growth metrics are the best way to measure the performance of your sales team, which should directly correlate to your growth.

6. Close Rate

The close rate is the percentage of leads converted into sales. It can be contentious because salesmen will naturally believe that if they didn’t close a sale, it wasn’t closeable. Often, they are right! This means that the close rate is not just a measure of sales performance but marketing as well.

7. Total Sales

You won’t find a KPI that more straightforwardly represents sales performance on a year-to-year or month-to-month basis than a B2B sales report.

8. Pipeline Velocity

How quickly are customers being pulled through the B2B marketing funnel? The more efficient the process of contacting, engaging, and converting customers is, the easier it will be for your company to scale.

9. Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC)

CAC is a measure of how much money was spent turning a prospect into a customer. This is the best metric for determining the ROI of your sales team. It may also be an indirect reflection of lead quality.

10. Sales by Product, Region, or Category

It’s important to parse data to make it more useful. Knowing that your total sales are growing is useful, but what if that growth is mainly driven by a rise in demand in a particular region or for a particular product? Knowing sales by product, region, or category allows you to leverage it to drive growth even further.

5 Best B2B Growth Metrics

These are the metrics we recommend checking to see how your company is growing.

11. Annual Recurring Revenue (ARR)

Recurring revenue is a prediction based on how much subscription-based revenue you expect to earn. You generally calculate ARR by first finding your monthly recurring revenue (MRR) and multiplying it by 12. Your churn rate will affect your ARR and MRR.

12. Churn Rate

Churn is the loss of customers due to failure to renew subscriptions. It’s a direct measure of how useful customers determine your product to be once they’ve used it.

A high churn rate could be cause for concern. You won’t get 2nd chances with most customers, so it’s important to keep churn manageable.

13. Net Promoter Score (NPS)

You measure net promoter score by simply asking customers to rank their likelihood of recommending your product on a scale of 1 to 10.

NPS is simple yet highly valuable. It directly predicts growth, since those who answer with high scores are very likely to recommend you to others. A high NPS score essentially correlates to how much of this free advertising you’re getting.

14. Average Deal Size

This can be measured by individual deals or by specifying a period of time. In the latter case, it’s akin to MRR/ARR. This is a great metric to track when going to market.

15. Average Sales Cycle

You want to know how long it takes to engage with prospects, turn them into buyers, and do it all over again. A long sales cycle is not necessarily a problem as long as it works for your industry. It may also ebb and flow during certain times of the year. You’ll need to pay close attention to this metric over a long period of time.

Product Analytics for B2B Growth is Easy with Hushly

Hushly’s automated customer experience platform collects data from every phase of the customer journey. We use this data to generate important insights that you can use to contribute to the growth of your business.

If you’re interested in a marketing partner ready and able to scale alongside you, contact our team and request a Hushly demo today.

A Guide to Building a Content Marketing Hub

Imagine a user who searches for a problem and finds your website that offers a potential solution.

The article they clicked on from the search result answers their questions, but there’s another blog on your website that answers a question they didn’t even know they had yet. It’s this question that, if answered, could lead to an instant conversion.

If your website isn’t utilizing a content marketing hub, there’s a great chance the user may never even notice this additional content.

On the other hand, if the content hub is nearby or even on the page they landed on, the odds of them clicking through to more content on your website increase dramatically.

If you want to attract more traffic to your website and keep it for longer, you’ll need to create a content marketing hub.

What is a Content Marketing Hub?

In broad terms, a content marketing hub is a place where all of your content is collected in one place. This includes all forms of content like blogs, social media, case studies, videos, user-generated content, and any other kinds you may be producing.

A content marketing hub is more specific than your website. This is because your website has to serve other purposes and isn’t purely organized around content like a content hub would be. A content hub should be thought of as a hub within your website where links to content are collected and sorted into easy-to-find buckets.

A content hub should be focused on making this information accessible to anyone interested in it.

What Should a Content Marketing Hub Include?

Fundamentally, your content marketing hub should be a place where all of your content marketing examples are displayed. Customers demand ease of use, so you’ll need to sort content by type, allow searches for specific information and keywords, and update dynamic and shifting webpages based on intent analysis and best practices.

Your content hub should be a one-stop shop for all of your content. A place where users can go to find answers to all their questions, engage with your content, and find the value that will eventually drive them to convert.

The Benefits of an Adaptive Content Hub

When it comes to content hubs, there is no question that you’ll want yours to be adaptive. At the very least, you’ll want it to update frequently with the latest content that tracks the ups and downs of your unique industry.

Here are a few of the benefits of an automated adaptive content hub:

Dominate SEO

Your content hub will be a cacophony of SEO keywords that boost your search rankings. It’s also a great opportunity to draw users in with one keyword and allow them to find content that they weren’t searching for.

Nurture Leads

An adaptive content hub can create personalized content streams tailored to attract your best buyers. These streams, or tracks, will funnel these users through content that meets them where they’re at in the buyer journey.

This means introductory material for customers who are first encountering your website, and more technical educational material for returning customers who’ve already purchased from you once and are more likely to do it again.

Lead with Value

You gain customer trust by proving to them that you know what problems they face and that your solution can counter those. The best way to do this is with free, ungated content that meets users where they are.

An adaptive content hub is the best way to keep customers on your website for longer by curating their content flow. The longer a user spends with your content, the more likely it is they trust it and will be willing to buy your solutions.

Build Loyalty and Engagement

When all of your content is in one easy-to-manage place, customers are incentivized to stay longer and engage more. Over time, consistent and high-quality content will convince customers that you know your industry well and are prepared to diagnose problems and find solutions.

The more trustworthy your content is, the easier it is for your loyal customers to share and engage with it. If you are legitimately providing value – that is, improving the customer’s life every time they engage with your content – why wouldn’t they keep coming back?

How to Create a Content Hub in 5 Steps

Here’s a list of steps to follow now that you’ve chosen to create a content hub on your website.

1. Categorize Existing Content

The first thing to do is sort your existing content by their commonalities. This should be based on factors like:

  • Content medium
  • Subject
  • Buyer journey stage
  • Technical detail

There are a few benefits to this step. Not only will you be better able to visualize the types of content you’ve already got, but it will also help you see where shortcomings are in your current content strategy. It may even become obvious what kind of content to produce next.

2. Build Internal Links

Linking from one piece of content to another is a great way to demonstrate authority over the topic that’s being discussed. It tells users that you’re not only writing on the topic at hand but that you’re experienced with the industry as a whole and ready to find solutions to any new problems that may arise.

3. Focus on the Customer Experience

Think about how the customer will be encountering your content. Which pieces might they find after searching for a question they may have? What are the most relevant details about your product for customers who are searching for those keywords?

These kinds of questions can shed light on the customer experience.

4. Observe, Gather Data, and Refine

Your content hub must remain living and flexible. The types of content that perform well today may not perform well next year. Gather data and check it often to monitor the performance of your content, find out what channels buyers are flowing through, and gain insights on what content needs to be delivered and when.

5. Use Hushly

Hushly can automatically manage every step of the customer experience journey, including curating your content hub. We’ll use intent data and analytics to produce content streams that are proven to increase engagement and drive conversions.

Best Content Hub Examples

Here are some examples of content hub websites to inspire your own:

Hushly’s Resource Center

Hushly maintains a resource center that allows users to search our content by type, category, or with a search feature.

Substack’s Inbox

Substack directs users to their inbox, which is filled with the most recent posts from users they’ve subscribed to.

MediaVidi’s Home Page

MediaVidi’s website is a content hub designed to suggest high-performing content, which is tagged and easy to sort through.

Hushly Makes Managing Content Hubs Easy

Hushly specializes in crafting adaptive content marketing hubs that update in real time depending on customer data and insights.

Our platform requires no developer. Customizing and personalizing your digital marketing content hub can be done with just a few clicks. We’ll also generate data from every step of the customer journey to give you insights into what’s working and what needs to change.

Hushly can help you scale by developing, managing, and optimizing your content hub. Contact our team today.

Should You Really Use a Content Experience Platform (CEP)?

Deciding on a strategy that will define your overall content experience is the easy part. The hard part is putting in the work to develop that experience across all forms of content.

If you’re thinking about implementing your own content experience strategy, then you’re probably wondering whether it would make more sense to employ a content experience platform to take on the job for you. There are plenty of ways to optimize on your own without a partner, yet few ways to match the data-driven analytics you’ll have access to with an automated platform.

We’ll lay out the case for using a content experience platform, but we’ll also explain the intricacies of the content experience, from what it is to how to start implementing one yourself, so you can make the best choice for your business.

What is the Content Experience?

The B2B content experience is the way all of your content relates to each other and forms a cohesive customer journey from landing page to checkout. A seamless and natural content experience is one in which the customer doesn’t have to try hard to find information about your product or why it should matter to them.

This is part of the reason why a great content experience should be a key part of any go-to-market strategy.

Your content experience should be an overarching voice or theme, which communicates a consistent message across all forms of content you produce. This includes content produced for every stage of the buyer journey. The main goal is steering prospects naturally through the content most likely to show value and convert them into buyers.

By focusing on and developing this goal through content production, you will naturally generate a content experience for customers. This experience should continue to develop over time as your products, customers, and market conditions evolve.

What is a Content Experience Platform?

A content experience platform (CEP) takes on the job of producing your content experience for you. Ideally, this includes everything from the way users first encounter your content, where they land on your website, what kind of content is recommended for them once they’re there, and generating data-driven customer insights.

5 Key Features to Look For in a Content Experience Platform

Here are five key features of a CEP:

1. Dynamic Web Design

Your website is the window through which your customers will look at your products. It’s where they’ll spend all their time engaging with your company online. Ideally, your website should be dynamically tailored to individual buyers.

Hushly’s platform allows clients to update their websites – including text, banners, calls to action, and more – to change in real time for individual customers.

2. Personalized Content

Once you’ve found your ideal buyers, it’s time to figure out what specific problems they may have and produce content tailored to their needs. This is the time to find your voice and stick to it in all forms of content.

Remember that there should be content for every step of the buyer journey. This includes the moment they find your landing page to the checkout process. The goal is a seamless transition from beginning to end.

3. Multiplatform Content

Customers today expect content in many formats and across many platforms. Some customers prefer written content, while many convert better with video content. You’ll need to mine your customers for data to figure out where they’re coming from and how they’d like to engage with your product.

It’s key that your content experience is cultivated across a wide range of content mediums. Blogs, social media posts, videos, audio, or podcasts each deserve special attention and a unique strategy that adheres to the overall content experience.

4. Digital Content Analytics

You’ll never have the perfect content experience because the ecosystem is constantly changing. There is a constant need to gather data on the performance of your strategy and update it on the fly.

You can try gathering data on your own, but it’s a complex process. It’s not always clear where to begin turning data into useful information. Instead, you should use a CEP like Hushly.

Hushly’s platform generates data from every stage of the customer experience, so you can analyze it from beginning to end. Hushly can give you insights like what content is resonating and where, engagement metrics, traffic sources, post-conversion analytics, and more.

5. Constant Optimization

However you’re getting your data, it’s important to use it to glean insight, so you can shape and optimize your content experience as needed.

The needs of your customers won’t stay the same, and your solutions to their new problems need to be flexible and responsive. A CEP should take data and optimization seriously to keep your strategy up to date.

Content Experience Platform vs. Content Marketing Software

A CEP is an automated service that takes on the task of optimizing your customer experience from beginning to end.

A CEP stands in contrast to typical content marketing software (CMS) which may focus narrowly on content creation, marketing, distribution, or content analytics. A CEP focuses more holistically on the way customers will be finding, consuming, and making decisions based on your content. It should also use data to generate insights that help you refine and update your content experience as market conditions change.

What Types of Content Can a CEP Manage?

Ultimately your content experience can be managed in a variety of ways. Depending on your customers and your product, a mixture of content mediums may be best, or you may find that your conversions rely on a single type of content. No matter your unique needs, a CEP should be able to manage all forms of content.

The idea behind the content experience is to push content that is relevant, valuable, and likely to drive engagement. A great CEP combines website customization with content personalization in service of the customer experience. Deciding what content works best for this is Hushly’s goal, and it’s the main reason we incorporate so much data and analytics into optimization.

The reality is that the best content is that which drives the most conversions, regardless of its medium, and your CEP should be capable of managing it.

A Content Experience Platform Can Save Time and Resources

The task of managing a content experience is unending.

There is the identification of buyers, content creation, deciding which content is most relevant to which buyers, personalization, multichannel outreach, and more. All must be carefully balanced and overseen to optimize performance.

Though it may be possible to manage on your own, hiring a content experience platform like Hushly could make your job a lot easier.

We’ll take on the time-consuming tasks for you. We know content marketing, and we’ve refined our system for years to take advantage of the massive amounts of data it generates. We use unparalleled customer insights to perfect the content experience, so you can focus on creating innovative solutions to customer problems.

If you’re ready to see what Hushly can do to make your content experience more seamless, request a CEP demo today.

Content Engagement: Definition, Importance, and Steps to Create It

Your ideal buyer has found your website thanks to your great SEO practices. They’re now on the landing page, hoping for an answer to a question they’ve been asking themselves for days.

This buyer has a problem and is ready to spend money on a solution. It happens that your company is in a position to provide that solution. You’ve got them where you want them, with their eyes on your website ready to consume content that will increase their likelihood of doing business with you. What happens next?

If your website’s content strategy is strong enough, this customer should find themselves in an engaging rabbit hole of information that answers their questions, reassures them that your product is right for them, and removes friction from the buying process.

Anything less than this is simply not going to compete with the modern advancements in marketing and technology.

Hushly knows this, which is why we created this introduction to content engagement. We’ll cover information on the definition of content engagement and how to measure it, as well as some concrete steps on how to increase audience engagement.

What is Content Engagement?

In broad terms, content engagement is the myriad ways users can react when consuming your content. The phrase content engagement doesn’t indicate a positive or negative reaction to the content, but rather the decision of the customer whether to amplify, consume and move on from, or ignore the content.

Every action, or inaction, that a user reacts with can provide valuable insight into the quality and value of the content they’re engaging with. This is the core principle behind content engagement.

What Does It Mean to Engage in Content?

A user may decide the information in your content is so valuable that they feel they need to share it with others. They may disagree and leave a comment. They may simply like the post or even ignore it completely and keep scrolling. Each of these technically represents content engagement.

Content engagement examples include social media engagement like clicks, shares, and other direct metrics like bounce rate. When marketers discuss content engagement, they are generally referring to concrete metrics like these.

In other words, content engagement is an important measure of the quality of your content.

Why is Content Engagement Important?

Knowing how strong your content is matters a great deal to your overall content strategy. Identifying which content is performing well can help you increase the efficiency of your marketing budget and direction.

It’s also the best way to build a loyal and interested customer base. In other words, a customer base that will be excited and knowledgeable enough to try out new features and give sophisticated feedback on how to improve your product.

What Content Gets the Most Engagement? 3 Examples of Engaging Content

Content that gets the most engagement often invites engagement by its very nature, like a poll or a quiz.

Here are three examples of content to create when you want to boost your engagement.

1. Polls and Quizzes

A well-conceived poll or quiz can elicit an emotional response from a customer. If a customer feels strongly about the question you asked, they’re far more likely to engage with it.

Polls and quizzes can encourage a customer to think about how your product affects their daily lives.

2. Case Studies

A case study is an example of a situation where your company found a problem and solved it. It’s a recap of the way your company successfully delivered value to a satisfied customer. The best case studies involve interviews with representatives from the company you worked with as well as in-depth explanations as to how your company recognized the opportunity for growth and executed that vision.

3. User-Generated Content

Polls show that users trust user-generated content more than content they perceive to have been created by a marketing team. They are more likely to engage with and enjoy this content, which means your company must find a way to identify UGC and add it to an accessible hub.

How Do You Measure Content Engagement?

The first step towards measuring content engagement is deciding what success means. You’ll need to know what your goals are concerning content engagement, including who you’re engaging with and why. Then, you can identify which engagement metrics will be most important for you to track.

Metrics like the ones we list below are invaluable data points in your quest to optimize content engagement. However, don’t forget about the context of these figures. They should each be weighed according to their importance to your overall plan.

  • Conversion Rate: Your best content is that which drives the most customers to buy your product.
  • Bounce Rate: A measure of visitors who enter your website only to immediately leave it. A high bounce rate could indicate poorly executed or difficult-to-find content.
  • Page Views Per Session: A sign of how many different web pages a user opened during a single session. More page views mean the user browsed more of your content.
  • Time on Site: A measure of how much time the user spent on your website.
  • Likes, Comments, Shares: Likes and shares are the most important to track for a social engagement strategy. Comments are also a great place to encourage discussion and build a community of users.

What is a Content Engagement Strategy?

A content engagement strategy is your plan to create content that satisfies customers’ needs and drives engagement. It can be implemented on its own or as part of a broader go-to-market strategy.

All of this is done in the service of improving sales conversions.

4 Elements of Creating Engaging Content

Ideally, a content engagement strategy has these elements:

1. Idealized Buyers

Buyer personas are the best way to theorize your ideal customer and form a plan to speak to them directly.

2. Identification of Pain Points

You should already have an idea of what kinds of problems the customer could be facing before creating content for them.

3. Efficient Solutions

Finding problems is easier than building solutions. Design content around your unique ideas. This is how you’ll build credibility and trust.

4. Plan to Drive Conversions

All content should be designed to increase conversions, not necessarily engagement. Don’t forget that engagement is just another measure of content quality, not the only or most important factor.

How Do You Make Digital Content Engaging?

Buyers today expect personalized content. To keep up with the demands of the marketplace, Hushly recommends thoroughly personalizing content to your most valuable buyers. This includes things like:

  • Adaptive content hubs
  • Dynamic websites
  • Personalized self-nurturing landing pages
  • A constantly refined data-driven approach

Consider personalizing messaging all the way down to website text, banners, logos, and calls to action.

Are you ready for Hushly to take on the job of developing your web content to drive engagement and boost conversions? Get a personal demo today.

How to Convert More B2B Buyers with Web Content Personalization

It’s not getting any easier for marketers without web content personalization partners to generate high-quality content that resonates with users.

Innovations like adaptive content hubs, content algorithms, and modern SEO practices mean that buyers have an easy time finding information on just about any subject they want to research. This is great for the average buyer, but an overabundance of information can lead to decision paralysis. It also makes it far more likely that below-par, non-personalized content will be ignored in favor of higher-quality options.

This combination of factors creates an environment where only the sharpest content can cut through the information overload. This means well-conceived and executed content, personalized for the buyers who matter most to your company’s growth.

Optimizing your web content personalization is the theme of today’s guide. We’ll explain the concept of personalized web content, why you should care about it, and suggest a few ways you can begin the process of personalizing web content today.

What is Web Content Personalization?

Web content personalization is a marketing strategy that involves tailoring web content to individual buyers. This is generally done by gathering information about the user, starting with things like how that user found the content, and slightly altering your website content to closely match their unique perspective.

In other words, web content personalization is the natural next step after recognizing that B2B buyers, like B2C customers, are individuals with unique concerns, needs, and buy thresholds. B2B buyers are also more likely to perform more research and demand more when it comes to features, availability, and customer service.

Non-personalized content is the way to deliver value to any customer who finds their way onto your website. Personalized content is a step above this, as it tries to deliver unique value to specific customers that your company hopes to form relationships with.

How Do I Personalize My Web Content?

Web personalization tools like Hushly are the best way to personalize web content.

However, if you prefer to do it alone and are interested in some of the best website personalization examples, we recommend starting with these steps.

Create Personas

The process of creating a website personalization strategy should begin with finding the targets of your personalization.

One of the most redeeming aspects of B2B website personalization is the fact that you can invest relatively little time and resources and potentially see a massive return.

You can begin by identifying several promising B2B candidate buyers and creating buyer personas for them. Use these personas to develop a unique strategy for engaging with that buyer. You should focus on details like the company’s niche, its pain points and growth engines, and ways your company can add value to its operation and aid in its growth.

Once you know what message you’re going with, you can start the process of customizing web content based on that campaign and targeting your ideal buyers.

Create Personalized Websites

A personalized website should speak directly to your target audience. This includes major details such as page names, text, and recommended content. These factors should be individualized, addressing the company or even the buyer directly. Letting the company know you’re aware of its place in the ecosystem and may already understand its issue can build trust.

Hushly’s automated web content platform creates dynamic experiences that can be personalized using any element of a webpage, including self-updating text, banners, calls to action, and more.

Use Self-Nurturing Landing Pages

Buyers should find content and educational materials with ease, directly from their personalized landing page. B2B buyers expect to browse your content at their own pace and in a way that makes sense to them. This is only possible when you combine powerful AI analytics with valuable buyer intent data to create truly personalized experiences.

Create an Adaptive Content Hub

Content hubs are places where users can find all of your content at once. They are important because users expect to find your content easily and on their schedule.

An adaptive content hub is the next generation of content hubs. It’s where developers use algorithms to optimize what content is displayed depending on the visitor. This makes it possible to recommend only the most relevant, conversion-driving content your website has to offer to the right buyer at the right time.

Gather Data and Refine

Gathering data is important every step of the way. The more you know about your customer’s behavior, the more you can predict their needs and provide valuable services.

You’ll want to know details like:

  • Content performance
  • Content engagement metrics
  • Conversion analytics
  • Trends and campaign performance

Hushly’s automated web platform is the best way to perfect your content strategy with data-driven analytics and modern AI solutions.

Why is Web Content Personalization Important?

As advancements in AI content generation, marketing, and distribution continue to roll out year after year, the face of content marketing is likely to change.

Buyers are savvy researchers with limited amounts of time. Why should they spend that time searching through a non-adaptive content hub, or hope they’ll skim the right headline if they scroll far enough through a blog page?

Just like in the past, it was once enough to simply create content and wait for buyers to find it. The day has come when it’s no longer enough to create content and hope that buyers don’t expect it to be accessible, valuable, and personalized.

Modern Website Personalization is Critical for Go-to-Market Strategies

Modern go-to-market strategies need to be flexible, durable, and constantly open to refinement. Website personalization is just the latest in a long list of things that go-to-market strategies require to perform well.

If you’re planning on launching a product, you’ve probably already identified an ideal buyer for that product before you began developing it. Why spend the time and effort developing a product to help a business grow, only to neglect to personalize their marketing content when you decide on your go-to-market strategy?

The Benefits of Web Content Personalization

The benefits of web content personalization include:

  • Better content engagement
  • Higher conversions
  • Better customer satisfaction
  • More repeat customers compared to non-personalized content.

A personalized content hub, with smart AI analytics to optimize the feed, will recommend the most relevant content to your most valuable buyers. This is because these buyers are three times more likely to buy more and regret less when information about a product or service is readily available.

There’s also the fact that 43% of B2B customers prefer to not interact with a sales rep at all. This means that, in many cases, the only opportunity you’ll have to educate and convert a customer is through your content marketing.

Personalization is Easy with Hushly

Personalization is simply one more step on the road to perfecting your content strategy.

If you feel you’d rather have an experienced web personalization specialist take on the stress of web content personalization for you, Hushly is ready to partner with you and grow together.

Ready to begin the process of personalizing your web content with an experienced partner? Try Hushly.

What Content Experience Means and Why It Matters

A B2B buyer that wants to solve a problem their company is facing begins a months-long sales cycle by researching keywords on Google.

If they come across your page, you’ve successfully captured their attention and now have the opportunity to pitch your solution.

If your content is high quality, the prospect will get a lot out of it and probably appreciate the free help you gave them. But then what? Do you keep their attention and provide more value, eventually leading to a closed sale? Or do you lose their attention to the search engines, and maybe another company?

The answer depends on the quality of your content experience.

Today’s guide will give you the principles behind this practice as well as some easy steps you can take to curate your own content experience.

What is Content Experience in Marketing?

Your content experience is closely related to your content matrix.

In a few words, your content matrix is the strategy behind the way you create content. It details the kinds of content you’re creating and who it’s for.

The content experience is how you deliver this content. It considers not just individual pieces of content and broader content strategies, but the entire user experience of your brand.

Curating a great content experience is about ensuring that needed content is delivered to the right people at the right time. Doing this builds brand trust and authority and ultimately increases conversions.

Why Content Experience Matters

Customers don’t always know what they’re looking for when researching solutions. You may capture the attention of someone from a Google search and then fail to convert them. It could be because your content was underwhelming. But it could also be that the user enjoyed your content, and appreciated it, but couldn’t easily find more.

A poor content experience means the user isn’t being recommended anything else that’s relevant to them, even if your site is filled to the brim with great information. The user simply doesn’t see it and instead clicks back to Google to find another link.

On the other hand, if your content experience is well designed, the user might come across another link to a relevant article on your website and click through to it.

Perhaps they spend some time on your website learning about your brand and product in a user-friendly way that doesn’t force them to engage in any way they don’t want to: you have videos if they prefer videos, blogs if they like to read, and most importantly, you gently suggest the right content based on a personalized profile you created in advance.

This is what a great content experience looks like, and it’s what you should strive for.

Prove You Know More Than Just One Thing

B2B buyers need content that doesn’t just address singular issues, but a broad stream of content that shows awareness of all their pain points and demonstrates that you know how to make their lives easier.

Your content experience is the management and philosophy behind the delivery of this content.

How to Create a Great Content Experience

Your content experience must be unique to your industry and company. It should even be personalized to individual buyers where possible. However, there are some universal principles that any great content experience should share.

Here are a few of those principles to help inspire your own content experience.

Start with a Content Audit

You should begin by taking a look at the content your marketing has already produced.

How well does each piece connect with the rest? Is there an overarching theme or message that pervades all pieces of content? If not, why not? Is it due to a lack of quality content, or perhaps a total lack of this kind of cohesiveness on the part of your whole marketing effort?

Knowing where you stand on these key issues will inform how you continue with the following steps.

Focus on Seamlessness

When we refer to a seamless experience, we’re talking about the way customers move through multiple pieces of content in a given session.

A customer may begin with a blog of yours they found on a SERP. Within that blog, there could be a link to a video on a related subject that actually is more closely related to what the user needs.

Alternatively, they could meet some microgated content that fills a similar need.

There is more art than science to the idea of seamlessness, but in general, it’s about minimizing the possibility of losing the customer’s attention once you’ve gained it.

Make Multi-Channel Content

Your content should be available in many formats.

Customers appreciate having multiple ways to engage with your brand. It also increases the odds of keeping their attention for longer because it reduces the odds they’ll become fatigued or bored with your content.

Personalize Content Whenever Possible

There’s a well-known public speaking dictum that states you should try and make eye contact with individuals even as you’re speaking to a large audience. It engages individuals and will make them feel like you’re speaking to them only.

The simple reality is that generic content is less engaging and less effective at converting target audiences. Your content should be personalized wherever possible to take advantage of the fact that people are eager to be heard.

Centralize Your Content

We recommend you set up a content hub.

Imagine going to Netflix and having to manually search for each movie or show you wanted to watch. It would be doable but cumbersome, and you’d miss the recommendations you’re currently given when you open up the app.

Your content hub should follow this example.

What is a Content Experience Platform?

A content experience platform like Hushly can make curating a great content experience easy.

Hushly believes ungated content captures higher quality and human-verified leads. We follow this data-driven philosophy with a simple platform focused on removing friction, personalizing content, and delivering this content on time to the right buyers.

You should never be done optimizing your content experience. There is always new content to show off and new customers to convert. Each new factor will require a fresh take on your overall content experience. This is something we understand instinctively, and we make it our mission to measure the performance of your content experience and optimize it with detailed analytics.

Great Content Needs Great Distribution

The challenge of creating high-quality and high-performing content regularly is immense.

It takes the dedication of many individuals and teams to produce relevant content that identifies customer needs and proposes solutions to them quickly and efficiently.

All of this effort could be for nothing if the content experience is lacking.

Users simply don’t have the attention spans necessary to wade through large catalogs of unorganized content. More importantly, they don’t have to. If your content experience isn’t cutting it, they’ll find a company that can manage theirs better to solve their problems.

Use the ideas in today’s blog to avoid this fate by curating a memorable content experience that will keep customers happy and coming back for more.

Take a look at Hushly’s eBook, Efficient Growth at Scale, for more information on how to manage your content experience.